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Stainless Work Platforms and Plant Safety

October 29, 2012

In an article entitled “Floor to Ceiling Food Safety,” Bob Sperber talks about how every aspect, from the roof, windows and doorways to the vegetation outside of a food processing plant should be reviewed for possible food safety hazards.  Food safety can be easily compromised in places other than the actual designated processing area.

Looking up to the roof is important, it must be inspected for leaks.  Water dripping into a facility can introduce dangerous contaminants such as salmonella.  Looking down underground is also important.  Old products like cast iron pipes leading out of food plants are being replaced with stainless drains and traps that lead to PVC pipes.  Many of these old pipes are being eaten away with the liquid they are draining, and are no longer effective and in fact can be dangerously harboring bacterial cells.  Inspecting and replacing above ground and underground faculties, such as these roofs and pipes, help keep food plants safe.

Flooring within the plants must be “smooth, drainable and cleanable” according to the article.  Slip resistant stainless flooring is an effective solution for processors looking for safety and hygienic.  Stainless work platforms by SlipNOT have been implemented throughout plants as a safe and efficient way to create work space and maintain safety standards.  While the floors are not smooth, the NSF registered non slip surface is cleanable and sustainable.  Stainless work platforms can be customized to fit the needs of the plant.

The article mentions certain innovations in the food industry that are on the rise and will aid in plant safety.  Things like walk able ceilings that separated food production areas and non-hygienic areas, using stainless steel clad freezer panels for interior wash down walls, using 3D virtual walk-through programs to reveal any potential risks and new technology that will aid in accountability from storage and retrieval across the supply chain will come into play more and more and will improve ceiling to floor plant safety.

Sperber, Bob. “Floor to Ceiling Food Safety.” www.foodprocessing.com. 9/3/2009. 10/22/12. < http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2009/plantoperations-foodsafety.html?page=2>

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