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Warehouse Safety Ergonomics

March 21, 2014

Warehouse and storage jobs are physically demanding jobs that if not performed wisely can produce up to double the amount of certain injury rates than other industries.  Jobs that involve bending, lifting, pushing with exertion, moving bulky objects and awkward body positions can cause sprains, strains and breaks in workers bodies.  According to an article on ehstoday.com many of these warehouse induced injuries can be prevented using correct ergonomics.

In order to reduce the chance of injury the article provides these safety suggestions:

1.)    Workers should use (and be trained on how to use) proper lifting techniques.
2.)    Make sure products and workers are aligned in a way that access does not require twisting of the back.
3.)    When activities such as lifting, pushing, pulling and placing are needed, try to ensure that the activity happens between knee and shoulder height.
4.)    Placement of heavy and awkward items should try to be placed between knuckle and elbow height.
5.)    Make sure that employees use proper equipment such as hoists, lifts and pulleys when working with heavy and awkward items.
6.)    Safety checks on all equipment must be done regularly to make sure that it is safe for workers to access.
7.)    Maintenance on carts is important in order to prevent strain while pushing.  It is also imperative that carts are not over loaded.
8.)    Have workers work as closely to neutral posture as possible.

Taking protective measures to keep workers from slip and fall accidents in a warehouse is also important.  Warehouses have areas that can become slippery with lubricants, dust, shavings or water.  SlipNOT® products help protect workers against sprains, strains and break that can happen when flooring is compromised.  Keeping everyone safe in the warehouse, no matter what the job, should be priority for companies worldwide.

Ware, Brandy Farris and Jeffery E. Fernandez.  “Warehouse Ergonomics/Tips and Techniques to Decrease Injury Risk.  www.ehstoday.com March 7, 2014. March 19, 2014

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